Chrome App

Disk Clock version 2 is a fully offline web application available in the Chrome Web Store.

Disk Lifetime

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. Solar year broadens the horizon to encompass a full year. Disk Lifetime puts time on an intensely personal scale. While none of us knows when we’ll leave this life, Disk Lifetime presents a reasonable guess – one lifetime, four generations, and eighty birthdays, set against the tropical zodiac. Stop for a moment to consider where you’ve been in life, where you’re going, and how you are going to use the precious birthdays you have left.

Disk Century

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. Solar year broadens the horizon to encompass a full year. Disk Century takes it even further, to a span longer than a typical human life. The units of measure are years and decades rather than minutes and hours. To even see the outer disks move takes great patience. And yet, when you do, it becomes possible to truly appreciated the passage of time.

Solar Year Disk

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. The Solar Year Disk beautifully presents the turn of the seasons.

Note that because this is a solar year, it turns at an even rate, and months are approximate. Solstices and Equinoxes are positioned at calculated positions (not simple quadrants), but are approximate. Light and dark show rough proportion of daylight throughout the year.

Disk Tzolk’in

The mesoamerican cultures had a fascinating calendar system based on interlocking cycles of 13 and 20. (Tzolk’in to the Maya, Tonalpohualli to the Aztec, and probably other names to other cultures.) Unfortunately, this only accounts for 260 days, so it was usually combined with a solar year counting system based on similar principles, but using a more traditional month/day arrangement. (The Haab) The combination of dates between the two systems repeated every 52 years, which became a time of major celebration.

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. Disk Tzolk’in shows the 13/20 interlocking cycle together with an entire 260 day disk. Outer disk relates the two cycles by alternating, overlapping colors.

Disk Apocalypse

Removed without cause by Chrome Store

Disk Long Count

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. Disk Long Count reinterprets the mesoamerican long count calendar (20 baktuns), shown as interlocking faces moving against a steady hand.

Six interlocking disks show off the cyclical nature of the long count.

1. Pictun (20 baktuns)
2. Baktun (20 katuns)
3. Katun (20 tuns)
4. Tun (18 uinals)
5. Uinal (20 kins)
6. Kin (a day)

Disk Calendar

Disk Clock takes the idea of clock and turns it inside-out by moving the faces instead of the hand. Disk Calendar extends the time period to week, moon, and year.

This is a calendar of sorts, built on natural cycles. Since the regular pace of a ‘clock’ doesn’t align well with irregular months and leap years, the pace is even. Thus, the year follows the solar year, and a moon stands in for a month. Weeks are thankfully regular, and work just as you’d expect.

Moon Disk

Rotates to show the current position in the lunar cycle. Like Day Disk, the moon disk provides a simple, single-purpose view of a natural cycle. One small note – the actual lunar cycle can vary by as much as fourteen hours, while the Moon Disk keeps a constant pace.

Disk Clock

Ever gotten the minute and hour hands confused? With Disk Clock, each disk rotates continuously past a single hand, always in the same place. Forget estimating which one is longer – disks don’t move around, and color coding helps you easily identify one time period from the the next. Disk Clock adds 4-hour, 1-hour, and 15-minute disks to the intuitive light-coded day disk (see below for more information on Day Disk)

Day Disk

Never get AM and PM confused again – with the Disk Clock Day Disk you have a full twenty-four hours, with day, twilight, night, and solar noon clearly displayed, along with a suggested bedtime.

Set your location (or let geolocation fill it in) to get daylight just right, and configure sleeping hours however you like.